Delhi University MA English Entrance Question Paper 2018 with Answers

1. 
Which one(s) of the following is/are true about Shakespeare’s Problem Plays?

i. They explore ignoble aspects of human nature.
ii. They deal with some moral problem.
iii. They challenge generic categorisation.
iv. The resolution of the plot seems to be problematic in these plays.Deselect Answer

2. 
Which of the following is/are true about Shakespeare’s major tragic characters ?

i. Complex and capable of surprising us
ii. Develop throughout the play
iii. Deep mutual relation and claim our sympathy
iv. Come to a realisation by the end of the playDeselect Answer

3. 
A doodle means a
4. 
Identify the wrong combination of author and book.
5. 
One feature that we easily notice about Shakespeare’s tragedies is their verbosity, because:

i. Tragedy comes with an unspeakable element
ii. Its characters struggle for meaning
iii. The characters are charismatic speakers
iv. They address fundamental problems of human experienceDeselect Answer

6. 
In Elizabethan play a Machiavelli character is:

i. A stage villain, full of cunning, calculation, wickedness and selfishness
ii. A character threatening to create political chaos and disorder
iii. A historical figure
iv. A pupil of MachiavelliDeselect Answer

7. 
What is the concept of negritude?
8. 
What is the study of poetic meter and form called?
9. 
Realism stands for...

i. A literary movement in 19th C
ii. A mode to represent life and experience in literature
iii. The depiction of subject with scientific objectivity
iv. The depiction of life as it really isDeselect Answer

10. 
Arrange the art history periods in the correct sequence:

i. Renaissance
ii. Medieval
iii. Baroque
iv. MannerismDeselect Answer

11. 
Assertion (A): Lyric poetry expresses the thoughts and feelings of the poet and is at times contrasted with narrative poetry and verse drama, which relate events in the form of a story. Reason (R): Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre relates events in the form of a story and therefore is a perfect example of a lyric poetry.
12. 
Plato`s Republic introduces the principle of specialization-` The result, then, is that more plantiful and better-quality goods are more easily produced if each person does one thing for which he is naturally suited, dose it at the right time, and is released from having to do any of the other.`

Add description here!Deselect Answer

13. 
Match List With List-II and choose the appropriate option from the codes given below:

List - I List - II 
(i) The world is my oyster 1. Simile
(ii) The vines wove their delicate fingers together  2. Hyperbole
(iii) My mouth was as dry as a bone  3. Metaphor
(iv) You snore louder than a freight train! 4. Personification 
Codes :
(i) (ii) (iii) (iv)
Deselect Answer

14. 
Fill in the blank with the appropriate option

___________________is an avant-grade movement, based primarily in France, that seeks to through a variety of literary and artistic experiments.Deselect Answer

15. 
Match List With List-II and choose the appropriate option from the codes given below:

List - I List - II 
(i) Prima facie 1. Public opinion
(ii) Carte blanche  2. Accepted as so until proven otherwise 
(iii) Carte diem    3. Unlimited authority
(iv) Vox populi  4. Seize the day
Codes :
(i) (ii) (iii) (iv)
Deselect Answer

16. 
Match List With List-II and choose the appropriate option from the codes given below:

List - I
List - II 
(i) Samuel Taylor Coleridge  a. Public opinion
(ii) William Blake  b. Ozymandis 
(iii) P. B. Shelly    c. The Tour of Doctor Syntax
(iv) William Combe  d. Christabel
Deselect Answer

17. 
Match List With List-II and choose the appropriate option from the codes given below:

List - I List - II 
(i) One Part woman  1. Ajay Navaria
(ii) The Gypsy Goddess  2. Kancha Illaiah 
(iii) Untouchable God    3. Perumal Murugan
(iv) Unclaimed Terrain  4. Meena Kandasamy
Codes :
(i) (ii) (iii) (iv)
Deselect Answer

18. 
The end of a work of art is simple to exit in its formal perfection, that is, to be beautiful and to be contemplated as an end in itself." Based on this statement certain inferences are given below. Identify the ones which completely approximates with this statement.

(i) this statement stresses on the form of the work, hence this can be read as a mouthpiece of formalistic criticism 
(ii) This statement has similarities to the rallying cry of Aestheticism which is also called "I` art pour  I` art" (Art for Art`s sake)
(iii) This statement stresses the religion of beauty as posited by Flaubert and Mallarme 
(iv) This statement anticipates the theory of the New Critics which highlight the autonomy and the artistry of a work artDeselect Answer

19. 
Match List With List-II and choose the appropriate option from the codes given below:

List - I List - II 
(i) Bharat  1. Vakrokitijivita
(ii) Anandvardhan 2. Vakyapadeeya 
(iii) Bhartrhari    3. Natyashastra
(iv) Kuntak  4. Dhvanyaloka
i          ii          iii          iv
Deselect Answer

20. 
Read the passage given below and fill in the Blank with the appropriate sequence of sentence.

Forster's lifelong refusal to permit his novel to be filmed begins to look rather sensible. But once a revisionist enterprise gets under way, the mere wishes of a dead novelist provide no
obstacle.........................................................................................................................................
........................................................................................................................The continuing
decline, the growing poverty and the meanness of spirit of much of Thatcherite Britain encourage many Britons to turn their eyes nostalgically to the lost hour of their precedence. The recrudescence of imperialist ideology and the popularity of Raj fictions put one in mind of the phantom twitching of an amputated limb
...............................................................................................................................................................in which it begins once again to strut and posture like a great power while in fact its power diminishes every year. The jewel in the crown is made, these days, of paste.

i. And there can be little doubt that in Britain today the refurbishment of the Empire`s tarnished image is underway.

ii. `Let`s Take the "Great" out of Britain`, that the idea of a great Britain (originally just a collective term for the countries of the British Isles, But repeatedly used to bolster the myth of national grandeur) has bedevilled the actions of all post-war government.

iii. Britain is in danger of entering a condition of cultural psychosis,

iv. But it was Margaret Thatcher who, in the euphoria of the Falklands victory, most plainly nailed her colours to the old colonial mast, claiming that success in the South Atlantic proved that the British were still the people `who had ruled a quarter of the world.Deselect Answer

21. 
Arrange the sentences P, Q, R, S given below in the appropriate order

It is the....
        (P) As the reader uses various perspective offered to hi by the text in order to relate the patterns and the "schematised views" to one another, he sets the work in motion, and this very process results ultimately in the awakening of respones within himself.

(Q) Virtuality of the work that given rise to its dynamic nature, and this in turn is the precondition for the effects that work calls forth.

(R) That this is no new discovery is apparent from references made even in the early days of the novel.

(S) Thus, reading caused the literary work to unfold its inherently dynamic character.Deselect Answer

22. 
Arrange the sentences P, Q, R, S given below in the appropriate order.

(P) The infant girl also experiences herself as an identified with her mother, as does the infant boy.

(Q) Because of her own gender identity, the mother identifies with her child more than with her boy child

(R) In relating to her daughter she unconsciously replays many of the ambiguities and identifications she experienced with her own mother.

(S) The mother thus often tends to ralate to her daughter more as an extension of herself than as a separate person.Deselect Answer

23. 
Read the passage given below and select the most appropriate option.

"As for being poisoned by a book, there is no such thing as that. Art has no influence upon action. It annihilates the desire to act. It is superbly sterile. The books that the world calls immoral are books that show the world its own shame."Deselect Answer

24. 
Fill in the blank with the appropriate option from the choices given below.

In "Women`s Time" Julia Kristeva`s main ______________ appears to be that in a modern society, human history attempts to regulate human behaviour into a kind of  ___________ which implies a certain dogma that is limiting and oppressive. Kristeva believes that feminism is in a position of becoming like religion, with all the limits and _________. According to Kristeva, feminism is in danger, because it has become (or is becoming) too ________ and restrictive, and therefore must be replaced.

i. religion
ii. restrictions
iii. condifed
iv. argumentDeselect Answer

25. 
Fill in the blank with the appropriate option

The combination of far-fetched circumstances with a terse moral suggests that this is a ___________Deselect Answer

26. 
Match List – I with List – II and appropriate option from the codes given below :

List - I
List - II 
i. Carnivalesque    a. Eliot
ii. Differance     b. Brecht  
iii. Alienation effect    c. Derrida
iv. Objective correlative    d. Bakhtin
Deselect Answer

27. 
Fill in the blanks with the most appropriate option from the choices given below:

Society, __________, and culture are three concepts whose meaning has changed recently, each change in one affecting the meaning of the other two as well. In short, each concept has conformed to a ___________ model: society, for instance, previously referred to active fellowship or company but in a bourgeois context refers to "civil society, " or commercial society. The meaning of economy has changed from _________ of house hold and community to the system of production, distribution, exchange, and _________ of modern capitalism.

i). bourgeois 
ii). management 
iii) economy 
iv). consumptionDeselect Answer

28. 
What is used as “vehicle” in the sentence “The camel is the ship of the desert.”
29. 
In Shakespeare’s Romantic Comedies a significant number of characters of the subplot:

i. come from the lower strata of society or behave like them
ii. parody the main plot
iii. wittingly / unwittingly help to sort out the problem of the characters in the main plot
iv. interacts with main plot at the end where everyone joins the celebrationsDeselect Answer

30. 
Which of the following are the substance of “Shakespearean Tragedy”?

i. It is a story of a single man of high stature.
ii. He has some tragic flaw, and acts as an agent of tragedy.
iii. He is subjected to unusually intense suffering.
iv. The last act results in the catastrophe that brings death to the major characters.Deselect Answer

31. 
Fill in the blank with the appropriate option :

______________ is a genre of late-18th-century literature that featured brooding, mysterious settings and plots and set the stage for what we now call “horror stories.” Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto, set inside a medieval castle, was the first major novel of this genre.Deselect Answer

32. 
Fill in the blank with the most appropriate option

___________________ is an American philosophical and spiritual movement, based in New England that focused on the primacy of the individual conscience and rejected materialism in favor of closer communion with nature. Ralph Waldo Emerson’s “Self-Reliance” and Henry David Thoreau’s “Walden” are famous works of this movement.Deselect Answer

33. 
Read the excerpt given below and select the most appropriate option in each case. (Question. 34 to 37)

Hoping to blossom (one day) into a flower,
Every bud sits, holding its soul in its fist.

Between the fear of the fowler and (approaching) autumn The bulbul`s life hangs by a thread.

The sly glance is mote murderous than arrow or sword;
It has shed the blood of many a love.

How can Chanda be dry lipped, O saqi of the heavenly wine!
She has drained the cup of they love.Deselect Answer

34. 
Who is the speaker in the poem?
35. 
Pick the odd one out
36. 
What is the central theme of the poem?
37. 
Identify the genre of the poem from the following features

(i) The presence of couplets
(ii) The address to a lover
(iii) The presence of bulbul and gul
(iv) The reference to the nom de plumeDeselect Answer

38. 
Which of the following novels are influenced by Gandhian Philosophy?

(i) Kanthapura
(ii) Waiting for the Mahatma
(iii) Gora
(iv) UntouchableDeselect Answer

39. 
Read the passage given below and select the most appropriate option in each case. (Question. 40 to 44)

Over the colonial period one of the most obvious markers of power was familiarity the English tongue and western culture, something that all these early writers had in common because of the language they chose to write in. In fact, novelist writing in the Indian languages would have read the some English Text - both canonical and popular-as they were products of the some educational system. The novelist in English however displayed their acquaintance with the classics of Western literature more obviously than the the others, possibly parading their knowledge as a validation of their status in the eyes of putative British readers. They never mentioned the middle- or low-brow writers who were widely read at the time-G. W. M. Reynolds, Wilkie Collins, Marie Corelli Benjamin Disraeli- whose influence on the Indian-language novels is well known. On the contrary, Indian writers in English took care to align with the best in various ingenious ways. Epigraphs from Byron, Scott, Cowper, Shakespeare and Coleridge were common practice, and quotations and reference were generously woven into the narrative, whether the context called for them or not.Deselect Answer

40. 
A knowledge and display of Western Classical literature by the English novelists ___________
41. 
The expression 'markers of power' can be best substituted by _________________.
42. 
The Indian novelists in English and those writing in the Indian languages shared a commonality in that ________________________.
43. 
The language in which the 'early writers' chose to write in was_________________.
44. 
Writers whose works were frequently used by the English novelists in India are ______________.
45. 
Fill in the blanks with the most appropriate option from the choices given below: (Question. 46 to 50)

Recourse to a neutralized language is (A) ____________ whenever it is a matter of establishing a practical (B)
____________between agents or groups of agents having partially or totally different interests. This is the case, of course, first
and foremost in the (C) ____________of legitimate political struggle, but also in the transactions and (D) ____________of
everyday life. Communication between classes (or, in colonial or semi-colonial societies, between ethnic groups) always (E)
____________a critical situation for the language that is used, whichever it may be.Deselect Answer

46. 
List for (A):

Add description here!Deselect Answer

47. 
List for (B) :
48. 
List for (D) :
49. 
List for (C) :
50. 
List for (E) :
51. 
Read the passage given below and select the most appropriate option given in each case. (Question. 52 to 53)

In his story Sarrasine, Balzac, speaking of a castrato disguised as a woman, writers this sentence: "It was Woman, with her sudden fears, her irrational whims, her in instinctive fears, her unprovoked bravado, her darling and her delicious delicacy of castrato concealed beneath the woman? Is it the man Balzac, endowed his personal experience with philosophy of woman? Is it the author Balzac. professing certain "literary" ideas of femininity? Is it universal wisdom? or romantic psychology? It will always be impossible to know, for the good reason that all writing is itself this special voice, consisting of several indiscernible voices, and that literature is precisely the invention of this voice, to which we cannot assign a specific origin: literature is that neuter, that composite, that oblique into which every subject escapes, that trap where all identity is lost, beginning with the very identity of the body that writers.`Deselect Answer

52. 
What is the essence of the passage?
53. 
This passage marks a shift from
54. 
Which one of the following statements is incorrect.
55. 
Which one of the following is true about New Criticism.
56. 
Read the passage given below and select the most appropriate option.

Criticism still consists for the most part in saying that Baudelaire's work is the failure of Baudelaire the man, Van Gogh's his madness, Tchaikovsky's his vice. The explanation of a work is always sought in the man or woman who produced it, as if it were always in the end, through more or less transparent allegory of the fiction, the voice of a single person, the author 'confiding' in us.

The central theme of the passage is:Deselect Answer

57. 
Read the passage given below and select the most appropriate option in each case. (Question. 58 - 61)

Orientalism is a style of thought based upon an ontological and epistemological distinction made between "the Orient" and (most of the time)" the Occident." Thus a very large mass of writer, among whom are poets, novelists, philosophers, political theorists, economists, and imperial administrators, have accepted the basic distinction between East and West as the starting point for elaborate theories, epics, novels, social description, and political accounts concerning the, its Orient, its people, Customs, mind, destiny, and so on.Deselect Answer

58. 
The passage suggests that the “basic distinction between East and West” is
59. 
Orientalism, according to this passage, is a
60. 
Orientalism, according to this passage, is too vast yet effective because
61. 
The theory of objective correlative was conceived by ____________
62. 
Pick the odd one out
63. 
Read the excerpt given below and select the most appropriate option in each case. (Question. 64 to 67)

My lord, I must confess I know this woman,
And five years since there was some speech of marriage 
Betwixt myself and her; which was broke off,
Party for that her promised proportions 
Come short of composition, but in chief
For that her reputation was disvalued 
In levity. Since which time of five years
I never spake with her, saw her, nor heard from her,
Upon my faith and honour.Deselect Answer

64. 
Identify the minimum number of characters required to be present on the stage while the above speech is delivered.
65. 
The above extract is an example of
66. 
The above extract reflects a:
67. 
The speaker of the given speech is in
68. 
Read the passage given below and select the most appropriate option in each case. (Question. 69 to 72)

Gray`s `Elegy in a Country Churchyard, `sets itself up as a structure of antitheses: the country versus the city, nature versus culture, those left outside history versus those who would appear to make it , appropriate forms of cultural memory versus inappropriate cultural memorials. It is also about the place of the poet, whose attempt to mediate between these oppositions is at once as attempt to articulate a role for himself as a culturally-vital mediator of such social oppositions.Deselect Answer

69. 
The difficulty with memorials (according to the extract) is that
70. 
The extract places Gray’s poem as an exercise based primarily on a pattern of
71. 
The extract prioritises the following theme as central to Gray’s elegy
72. 
The role of the poet (as envisaged in the extract) approximates to that of
73. 
Read the excerpt given below and select the most appropriate option in each case. (Question. 74 to 76)

William Congreve`s Way of the World contains the following warning about critics:
Others there are whose malice we`d prevent,
Such, who watch plays, with scurrilous intent
To mark out who by characters are meant.
These, with false glasses feed their own ill-nature,
And turn to libel, what was meant a satire.Deselect Answer

74. 
The expression 'mark out who by characters are meant' means that:
75. 
According to the passage, who are responsible for turning a satire in libel?
76. 
Which of the following statement is true in the context of the passage?
77. 
Read the excerpt given below and select the most appropriate option in each case. (Question. 78 to 80)

Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world, 
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.

Surely some revelation is at hand;
Surely the Second Coming is at hand.
The Second Coming! Hardly are those words out'
When a vast image out of spiritus Mundi
Troubles my sight: somewhere in sands of the desert 
A shape with lion body and the head of a man
A gaze blank and pitiless as the sun,
Is moving its slow thighs, while all about it
Reel shadows of the indignant desert birds.
The darkness drop again; but now I know
That twenty centuries of stony sleep
Were vexed to nightmare by a rocking cradle,
And what rough beast, its hour come round at last,
Slouches towards Bethlehem to be born?Deselect Answer

78. 
Identify the meter of the above poetic lines:
79. 
What is the possible mood/tone of the lines:
80. 
What is the most recurrent symbol in the above lines:
81. 
Which of the following statements are correct about the Literature of the Absurd:

(i) The Human condition is essentially absurd
(ii) Human beings may be capable of heroism and dignity even in defeat
(iii) It is influenced by existential philosophy
(iv) The human world possesses no inherent truth, value and meaningDeselect Answer

82. 
Read the passage given below and select the most appropriate option in each case. (Question. 83 to 86)

When they got out of the carriage at Oreanda they sat down on a bench not far from the church, and looked down at the sea, without talking. Yalta could be dimly discerned through the morning mist, and white clouds rested motionless on the summits of the mountains. Not a leaf stirred, the grasshoppers chirruped and the monotonous hollow roar of the sea came up to them, speaking of peace, of the etemal sleep lying in wait for us all. The sea had roared like this long before there was any Yalta or Oreanda, it was roaring now, and it would go on roaring, just as indifferently and hollowly, when we had passed away. And it may be that in this continuity, this utter indifference to the life and death of each of the us lies hidden the pledge of our eternal salvation, of the continuous movement of life on earth of the continuous movement toward perfection.

Side by side with a young woman, who l0oked so exquisite in the early light, soothed enchanted by the sight of all this magical beauty-sea, mountains, clouds and the vast expanse of the sky-Gurov told himself that, when you came to think of it, everything in the world is beautiful really, everything but our own thoughts and actions, when we lose sight of the higher aims of life, and our dignity as human beings 

Someone approached then-a watchman, probably-looked at them and went away. And there was something mysterious and beautiful even in this. This steamer from Feodosia could be seen coming towards the pies, lit up by the dawn, its lamps out.

"There`s dew on the gross," said Anna Sergeyevna, breaking the silence.

"Yes. Time to go home".

They went back to the town.

After this they met every day at noon on the promenade, lunching and dining together, going for walks, and admiring the sea. She complained of sleeplessness, of palpitation, asked the same questions over and over again, alternately surrendering to jealousy and the fear that he did nit really respect herDeselect Answer

83. 
The ‘church’ and the ‘watchman’ are details that serve to:

When they got out of the carriage at Oreanda they sat down on a bench not far from the church, and looked down at the sea, without talking. Yalta could be dimly discerned through the morning mist, and white clouds rested motionless on the summits of the mountains. Not a leaf stirred, the grasshoppers chirruped and the monotonous hollow roar of the sea came up to them, speaking of peace, of the etemal sleep lying in wait for us all. The sea had roared like this long before there was any Yalta or Oreanda, it was roaring now, and it would go on roaring, just as indifferently and hollowly, when we had passed away. And it may be that in this continuity, this utter indifference to the life and death of each of the us lies hidden the pledge of our eternal salvation, of the continuous movement of life on earth of the continuous movement toward perfection.

Side by side with a young woman, who l0oked so exquisite in the early light, soothed enchanted by the sight of all this magical beauty-sea, mountains, clouds and the vast expanse of the sky-Gurov told himself that, when you came to think of it, everything in the world is beautiful really, everything but our own thoughts and actions, when we lose sight of the higher aims of life, and our dignity as human beings 

Someone approached then-a watchman, probably-looked at them and went away. And there was something mysterious and beautiful even in this. This steamer from Feodosia could be seen coming towards the pies, lit up by the dawn, its lamps out.

"There`s dew on the gross," said Anna Sergeyevna, breaking the silence.

"Yes. Time to go home".

They went back to the town.

After this they met every day at noon on the promenade, lunching and dining together, going for walks, and admiring the sea. She complained of sleeplessness, of palpitation, asked the same questions over and over again, alternately surrendering to jealousy and the fear that he did nit really respect her

The ‘church’ and the ‘watchman’ are details that serve to:Deselect Answer

84. 
The woman’s “sleeplessness” and “palpitations” most clearly indicate __________
85. 
In the first paragraph, the sea is viewed as
86. 
The description of "the hollow roar of the sea" serves to underscore the
87. 
Read the passage given below and select the most appropriate option in each case. (Question. 88 to 90)

The figure of that dark avenger stood forth in his mind for whatever he had heard or divined in childhood of the strange and terrible. At night he built up on the parlour table an image of the wonderful island cave out of transfer and paper flowers and coloured tissue paper and strips of the silver and golden paper in which chocolate is wrapped. When he had broken up this scenery, weary of its tinsel, there would come to his mind the bright picture of marseille, of sunny trellises, and of Mercedes.
Outside Blackrock, on ther road that led to the mountains, stood a small whitewashed house in the garden of which grew many rosebushes: and in this house, he told himself, another Mercedes lived. Both on the outward and on the homeward journey he measured distance by this landmark: and in his imagination he lived through a long train of adventure, marvellous as those in the book itself, towards the close of which there appeared an image of himself, grown older and sadder, standing in a moonlit garden with Mercedes who had son many years before slighted his love, and with a sadly proud gesture of refusal, saying; Madam, I never eat muscatel grapes.Deselect Answer

88. 
Mercedes is
89. 
What does this passage depict ?
90. 
This passage is an example of:
91. 
Read the excerpt given below and select the most appropriate option in each case. (Question. 92 to 96)

The wind was husking, hushing hosting,
worrying the slimed leaves of the wood.
Moon's light, thick as Witches Butter,
stuck to branch bark and to lifting leaves.
Standing under fitful oaks, under Orian
Bullying the gods, I saw car lights
stabbing past the rain-blacked trunks,
and heard the peacock shriek, the Owl,
hoot. Men had landed on the moon.
As men shot dirty films in dirty motel rooms,
guerrillas sucked cold rice and fish.
Wind-spooked leaves scratched my cheek.
Blood on the bark stung the hand.
In a puddle's moon eye I saw a shape:
A machine gun was cracking like slapping sticks.
A yelling man smacked into the smooth canal.Deselect Answer

92. 
‘Guerrillas’ are
93. 
The poem makes a contrast between
94. 
‘Moon’s light, thick as Witches Butter’ is an example of
95. 
The verse form of the poem can be best described as
96. 
‘Husking, hushing, hosting’ is an example of
97. 
Read the passage given below and select the most appropriate option in each case. (Question. 98 to 100)

Historiography, the writing of `history`, defined as the scientific (i.e. evidence-based) investigation of the past, developed in Greece in the 5th century BC. We can use pre-historical literature such as epic or lyric as a guide to early Greek history. For the Greeks themselves, the Homeric epics were the supreme examples of historical writing because they narrated the heroic origins of their society. and even pioneering historians like Herodotus and Thucydides, who took a more sceptical attitude to earlier (mythological) accounts of valuable source of information on early Greek culture. Historians, both Greek and Roman, had to engage with epic, not least because they were dealing with very similar material: great wars and courageous acts, disastrous decisions and failures, survival and renewal. Indeed, from the very beginning history draws upon a wide rang of genres, from poetry in all its forms to philosophy and science, including geography and ethnography.Deselect Answer

98. 
Homeric epics were valuable for the Greeks because ___________________.
99. 
History is to be viewed as _____________________.
100. 
Historiography is ______________________.
101. 
Read the excerpt given below and select the most appropriate option in each case. (Question. 102 to 106)

He came to death with his mind drowning.
on the last day he enclosed himself
in a room with two bottles of gin, later
fell the length of his body
so that brain blood moved
to new compartments 
that never know the wash of fluid 
and he died in minutes of new equilibrium.
His early life was a terrifying comedy 
and my mother divorced them again.Deselect Answer

102. 
The poem depicts…
103. 
The poem is an example of

i. Elegy
ii. Epitaph
iii. OdeDeselect Answer

104. 
Equilibrium in the extract stands for…
105. 
In these lines the speaker is predominantly using …
106. 
Who is the “He” the speaker is referring to?
107. 
Traveling, a man met a tiger, so.. (Question. 108 to 110)

He ran. And the tiger ran after him
Thinking: How fast I run.. But
The road thought: How long I am.. Then,
They came to a cliff, yes, the man
Grabbed at an ash root and swung down
Over its edge. Above his knuckles, the tiger..
At the foot of the cliff, its mate. Two mice,
One black, one white, began to gnaw the root.
And by the traveler’s head grew one
Juicy strawberry, so..hugging the root
The man reached out and plucked the fruit.
Hot sweet it tasted!Deselect Answer

108. 
The final action of the traveller testifies to the poet's __________________
109. 
The above lines may be described as a _____________
110. 
The poem may be read as a cautionary tale that warns against ______________
111. 
The worst part was not the hunger or the thirst. It was to sit here, helpless, and listen to the policemen making their announcements, hearing them say that our lives, our existence, were worth less than dirt or dust. ‘This island has to be saved for its trees, it has to be saved for its animals, it is part of a reserve forest, it belongs to a project to save tigers, which is paid for by people from all around the world.’ Every day, sitting here with hunger gnawing at out bellies, we would listen to these words over and over again. Who are these people, I wondered, who love animals so much that they are willing to kill us for them? Do they know what is being done in their name…As I thought of these things, it seemed to me that this whole world had become a place of animals . . . (Question. 112 to 113)
112. 
The character is expressing her resentment that people like her are being treated as.........
113. 
The character in this passage is providing an eloquent critique of.....
114. 
“Staring unflinchingly into the abyss of slavery, this spellbinding novel transforms history into a story as powerful as Exodus and as intimate as a lullaby, Sethe, its protagonist, was born a slave and escaped to Ohio, but eighteen years later she is still not free…” (Question. 115 to 117)
115. 
The character mentioned in this passage is said to have escaped from slavery, but is still not “free”. What is the freedom referred to in this passage?
116. 
Whose “Slavery” is referred to in the above passage?
117. 
What is the exodus referred to in the passage?
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